A Worthy Cause

Putting Families First During Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

By providing insurance to combat cancer and the hardships that come with it

By Wendy Herndon

Wendy Herndon is second vice president of Product Launch and Adoption at Aflac. With more than 20 years of experience in this field, she is responsible for providing the overall strategy for all product-related launch, promotional and educational activities.

Each year in the U.S., about 16,000 children face a cancer diagnosis.1 During Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September, especially with the COVID-19 pandemic holding the country’s attention, this immunocompromised community deserves our support more than ever.

No parent wants to think about the possibility of his or her child getting cancer, especially considering the physical effects of the disease. However, even with health insurance, many may be unprepared for the considerable effect out-of-pocket expenses associated with treatment can have on a family’s finances. Brokers and agents are positioned to offer benefits advice to help families be better prepared if the unfortunate occur.

Get Help With Expensive Cancer Treatment Costs

A misconception about cancer insurance is that it only covers basic care like hospital stays or chemotherapy — both typically covered by health insurance. However, as treatment plans change, cancer coverage has also evolved to help with expenses related to one’s entire care journey, from treatment to recovery. Insurers in step with these advances now offer enhanced benefits for treatments like immunotherapy and for an insured’s anniversary of being cancer-free, an inspiring milestone for a young child in remission.

Brokers and agents can also consider the significant out-of-pocket expenses families facing a diagnosis may experience. A child’s cancer diagnosis may necessitate a variety of costs for families such as temporary care for siblings and pets, traveling long distances to visit specialists or getting takeout while on the road. Families will rightfully do whatever it takes to get their children the help they need, and they deserve benefits that can bring those goals to fruition. Health insurance may not take these other expenses into consideration, but supplemental insurance does by paying insureds cash benefits directly, unless otherwise assigned, so families can focus on what matters most — recovery.

Health insurance may not take these other expenses into consideration, but supplemental insurance does by paying insureds cash benefits directly, unless otherwise assigned, so families can focus on what matters most — recovery...

Cancer not only takes a toll physically and financially, but emotionally, as well. Another consideration to keep top of mind is whether the insurer provides access to counseling services with licensed oncology social workers. Having a trusted support group helps afford cancer patients and their families the opportunity to share their honest concerns — a meaningful service as they navigate life during and after a cancer diagnosis.

Purpose Behind The Product

Consumers want to do business with companies that align with their ideas of social responsibility. When looking for an insurance carrier, consider companies whose products align with their purpose. For example, Aflac has given more than $146 million to the childhood cancer cause over the past 25 years. And their newest cancer insurance policy provides coverage for dependent children at no additional charge. This is one way insurance companies can give back, making an impact on patients beyond the benefits they pay.

Going Beyond The Benefits

While the country continues navigating the challenges associated with the pandemic, Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is a reminder that those of all ages facing the disease still press on with their cancer journeys. Brokers and agents have the unique opportunity to help provide clients benefits solutions for the families comprising their businesses — and bring attention to a worthy cause.

 

 

 

1 U.S. Childhood Cancer Statistics. American Childhood Cancer Organization. https://www.acco.org/us-childhood-cancer-statistics. Accessed Aug. 10, 2020.